Explore Massachusetts Minimum Wage

Stay informed about Michigan minimum wage laws and regulations. Find comprehensive information on the current minimum wage rates in Michigan.

Get Minimum Wage

Introduction to Massachusetts Minimum Wage

Definition and Significance of Minimum Wage

Minimum wage is the lowest legally mandated hourly pay that employers must offer their workers. Established to ensure a basic standard of living for employees, the minimum wage serves as a crucial economic safeguard. It helps mitigate poverty, reduces income inequality, and ensures that even the lowest-paid workers can meet their essential needs.

Overview of Massachusetts' Minimum Wage Laws

Massachusetts has a robust framework governing minimum wage, reflecting the state's commitment to fair labor practices. As of 2024, the Massachusetts minimum wage stands at $15.00 per hour for non-tipped employees. This rate positions Massachusetts among the states with the highest minimum wages in the country, demonstrating its progressive approach to labor rights and economic justice.

Key Aspects of Massachusetts Minimum Wage Laws:

  • Statewide Minimum Wage: The current rate applies universally to all non-exempt workers across Massachusetts, ensuring a consistent baseline pay.
  • Tipped Employees: For employees who earn tips, the minimum cash wage is set at $6.75 per hour, provided their total earnings with tips meet or exceed the standard minimum wage. If not, employers are required to make up the difference.
  • Scheduled Increases: Massachusetts has implemented a structured plan for periodic wage increases, ensuring that the minimum wage keeps pace with inflation and the rising cost of living.
  • Exemptions and Special Provisions: Certain categories of workers, such as those under 18, trainees, apprentices, and workers with disabilities, may have different wage standards. These provisions are tailored to balance fair pay with the specific needs of these groups.

Massachusetts' minimum wage laws not only provide financial security to workers but also stimulate the local economy by boosting consumer spending. Higher wages empower workers to spend more on goods and services, thereby driving economic growth and supporting businesses throughout the state.

Understanding the definition and significance of minimum wage is essential for appreciating the broader economic and social impacts of these laws. Massachusetts' comprehensive minimum wage framework underscores the state's dedication to ensuring fair pay and fostering economic well-being for all its residents.



Historical Context of Massachusetts Minimum Wage

Evolution of Minimum Wage in Massachusetts

The concept of minimum wage in Massachusetts has evolved significantly over the years, reflecting the state’s commitment to economic justice and fair labor standards. The journey began in 1912, when Massachusetts became the first state in the U.S. to establish a minimum wage law. This pioneering move set a precedent for other states and highlighted the importance of ensuring a basic income for all workers.

Since then, the Massachusetts minimum wage has undergone numerous adjustments to address economic changes and inflation. These periodic increases have aimed to protect the purchasing power of workers and maintain a standard of living that aligns with the cost of living. For instance, the minimum wage saw substantial increments in the late 20th century and into the 21st century, culminating in the current rate of $15.00 per hour as of 2024.

Key Legislative Milestones and Historical Amendments

  • 1912: Massachusetts enacts the first minimum wage law in the United States, setting a standard for other states to follow.
  • 1968: The Massachusetts minimum wage is aligned with the federal minimum wage for the first time, ensuring consistency across state and federal laws.
  • 1999: A major legislative amendment raises the state’s minimum wage to $6.00 per hour, one of the highest in the nation at the time.
  • 2006: Another significant increase sets the minimum wage at $8.00 per hour, reflecting rising living costs.
  • 2014: Legislation is passed to incrementally raise the minimum wage to $11.00 per hour by 2017.
  • 2018: The "Grand Bargain" legislation is enacted, scheduling gradual increases to reach $15.00 per hour by 2023.

These key legislative milestones illustrate Massachusetts' proactive approach to labor rights and economic fairness. Each amendment has been a response to economic conditions and the needs of workers, ensuring that the minimum wage remains a viable means of support for employees.

Comparison with the Federal Minimum Wage and Trends Over the Years

The Massachusetts minimum wage has often been significantly higher than the federal minimum wage, reflecting the state's commitment to providing a livable income for its residents. As of 2024, the federal minimum wage remains at $7.25 per hour, a rate that has not changed since 2009. In contrast, Massachusetts' rate of $15.00 per hour demonstrates a more aggressive approach to addressing wage adequacy.

Over the years, trends indicate that Massachusetts has consistently led the way in wage reforms, often setting benchmarks that influence federal policy discussions. The state's higher minimum wage has not only benefited workers but has also spurred economic activity by increasing consumer spending power.

Understanding the historical context of Massachusetts minimum wage provides valuable insights into the state's labor policies and economic priorities. The evolution of minimum wage laws, key legislative milestones, and comparisons with the federal minimum wage underscore the progressive stance Massachusetts has taken in ensuring fair wages for its workforce. This historical perspective highlights the state's role as a leader in advocating for worker rights and economic equity.



Current Minimum Wage Rates in Massachusetts

Statewide Minimum Wage for Non-Tipped Employees

As of 2024, the statewide minimum wage for non-tipped employees in Massachusetts is set at $15.00 per hour. This rate reflects the state’s commitment to ensuring that all workers receive fair compensation that aligns with the cost of living. By maintaining a relatively high minimum wage, Massachusetts aims to reduce poverty and income inequality, providing its residents with a more secure financial footing.

Minimum Wage for Tipped Employees

For tipped employees, Massachusetts has established a different wage structure. The minimum cash wage for tipped workers is $6.75 per hour. However, it is important to note that the total earnings, including tips, must equal or exceed the standard minimum wage of $15.00 per hour. If an employee’s tips do not bring their total earnings up to this amount, the employer is required to make up the difference. This ensures that tipped employees are guaranteed a baseline income comparable to their non-tipped counterparts, providing financial stability across the board.

Recent Changes and Scheduled Future Increases

The Massachusetts minimum wage has seen several changes over the years, driven by the need to keep pace with inflation and rising living costs. The most recent significant change was the gradual increase to $15.00 per hour, which was fully implemented by 2023 as part of the "Grand Bargain" legislation passed in 2018. This legislation outlined a series of incremental raises, starting from $11.00 per hour in 2018, increasing by $1.00 each year until reaching the current rate.

Looking forward, there are discussions about potential future increases to ensure the minimum wage continues to meet the economic needs of workers. These prospective changes are part of ongoing efforts to balance fair wages with economic sustainability, ensuring that all Massachusetts workers can maintain a decent standard of living.

Differences Between Small and Large Employers

Massachusetts minimum wage laws apply uniformly across all businesses, regardless of size. Unlike some states that have different minimum wage rates for small and large employers, Massachusetts maintains a single rate to ensure consistency and fairness. This approach simplifies compliance for businesses and guarantees that all employees, whether working for a small local business or a large corporation, receive the same baseline pay.

The current minimum wage rates in Massachusetts reflect the state’s progressive approach to labor rights. By maintaining a high minimum wage, differentiating tipped employee wages, and planning for future increases, Massachusetts strives to provide economic security for all its workers. The uniform application of these rates across employers of all sizes further underscores the state's commitment to fairness and equity in the workplace.



Special Provisions and Exemptions

Specific Provisions for Youth Workers, Trainees, Apprentices, and Disabled Workers

Massachusetts minimum wage laws include several special provisions and exemptions designed to accommodate the unique circumstances of specific worker groups. These provisions ensure that while the general workforce benefits from a high minimum wage, there are flexible standards in place for certain categories of workers to promote employment opportunities and skill development.

Youth Workers: For employees under the age of 18, Massachusetts allows a lower minimum wage during their first 90 days of employment. This provision is intended to encourage employers to hire young workers, giving them valuable work experience and an opportunity to earn an income. After this period, youth workers are entitled to the full state minimum wage.
Trainees and Apprentices: Individuals undergoing training or participating in apprenticeship programs may also be paid a lower rate. This exemption recognizes that these workers are gaining specialized skills and knowledge that will benefit their future careers. The training wage is a temporary measure, ensuring that once the training period is completed, these workers receive the standard minimum wage.
Disabled Workers: Workers with disabilities can be employed at a wage rate below the minimum wage if their productivity is affected by their disability. This provision is designed to create employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, enabling them to participate in the workforce while ensuring that their wages reflect their productivity levels.

These specific provisions help balance the need for fair wages with the goal of promoting employment and skill development among diverse worker groups.

Industry-Specific Provisions and Their Impact on Workers and Employers

In addition to the general minimum wage laws, Massachusetts has established industry-specific provisions that address the unique needs of various sectors. These provisions ensure that wage regulations are tailored to the economic realities of different industries, balancing fair compensation with the sustainability of businesses.

Hospitality and Service Industries: In sectors such as hospitality and food service, where tipping is common, Massachusetts has set a lower cash wage for tipped employees, currently at $6.75 per hour. Employers must ensure that the total earnings (wages plus tips) meet or exceed the standard minimum wage of $15.00 per hour. This structure supports both the financial stability of employees and the operational viability of businesses in these industries.
Agricultural Workers: For agricultural workers, the minimum wage laws take into account the seasonal nature of agricultural work and the economic pressures faced by farmers. While agricultural workers are generally entitled to the standard minimum wage, there are specific provisions that allow for flexibility in certain circumstances.
Seasonal and Part-Time Workers: Employers who hire seasonal or part-time workers may have different wage requirements to accommodate the temporary nature of these positions. These provisions help ensure that businesses can adjust their workforce according to seasonal demands while still providing fair compensation to workers.

The impact of these industry-specific provisions on workers and employers is significant. For workers, these tailored regulations ensure that they receive fair wages while taking into account the economic realities of their industries. For employers, the flexibility offered by these provisions helps maintain the financial viability of their operations, allowing them to comply with wage laws without compromising their business sustainability.

The special provisions and exemptions in Massachusetts minimum wage laws demonstrate a nuanced approach to labor regulations. By addressing the needs of youth workers, trainees, apprentices, disabled workers, and various industries, Massachusetts ensures that its minimum wage laws are fair, flexible, and conducive to both worker well-being and business success.



Recent Legislative Updates for Massachusetts Minimum Wage

Most Recent Changes to Massachusetts' Minimum Wage Laws

In recent years, Massachusetts has seen significant legislative activity aimed at adjusting the minimum wage to better reflect the economic realities faced by workers. The most notable change was the passage of the "Grand Bargain" legislation in 2018, which set a clear schedule for incremental increases in the state’s minimum wage. This landmark legislation aimed to raise the minimum wage to $15.00 per hour by 2023, a goal that was achieved on schedule. The phased increases began with an initial bump from $11.00 to $12.00 per hour in 2019, followed by annual increases of $1.00 each January until reaching the current rate.

Additionally, the legislation addressed the minimum wage for tipped employees, gradually increasing their minimum cash wage while ensuring their total earnings, including tips, would meet or exceed the standard minimum wage. These changes reflect Massachusetts' proactive stance on ensuring fair compensation for all workers, especially those in lower-wage jobs.

Analysis of the Legislative Process and Stakeholder Involvement

The process of updating the minimum wage laws in Massachusetts involved extensive negotiations and input from a diverse range of stakeholders, including labor unions, business groups, and advocacy organizations. The "Grand Bargain" is a prime example of this collaborative approach. Labor unions advocated strongly for higher wages, emphasizing the need for a livable income for workers. Business groups, while supportive of fair wages, expressed concerns about the potential impact on small businesses and their ability to absorb higher labor costs.

To address these concerns, the legislation included measures such as the gradual phase-in of wage increases, giving businesses time to adjust. Stakeholder involvement was crucial in shaping a balanced approach that aimed to benefit workers while mitigating adverse effects on businesses. Public hearings, consultations, and negotiations ensured that the voices of all parties were heard, resulting in a comprehensive and equitable wage policy.

Future Projections and Proposed Changes

Looking ahead, discussions about future adjustments to the Massachusetts minimum wage continue. Economic conditions, inflation rates, and cost of living adjustments will likely drive the need for further increases to maintain the purchasing power of workers. Proposals under consideration include automatic annual adjustments tied to inflation, ensuring that the minimum wage keeps pace with economic changes without requiring new legislation for each increase.

There are also ongoing debates about additional measures to support low-wage workers, such as enhancing the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and expanding access to affordable housing and healthcare. These proposals aim to provide a more holistic approach to improving the financial well-being of workers, addressing not just wages but also the broader economic challenges they face.

The recent legislative updates to Massachusetts' minimum wage laws reflect a commitment to fair wages and economic justice. The collaborative legislative process and stakeholder involvement have resulted in balanced policies that support both workers and businesses. Future projections and proposed changes indicate a continued focus on adapting the minimum wage to ensure it meets the evolving needs of the workforce, reinforcing Massachusetts' role as a leader in progressive labor policies.



Section 7: Economic Impact of Minimum Wage in Massachusetts

Analysis of How Minimum Wage Increases Affect Employment Rates

Increasing the minimum wage in Massachusetts has sparked extensive debate regarding its impact on employment rates. Proponents argue that higher wages lead to increased worker satisfaction, reduced turnover, and enhanced productivity, which can positively influence employment rates. Critics, however, express concerns that higher labor costs may lead businesses, especially small ones, to reduce their workforce or slow down hiring.

Recent studies have shown a nuanced picture. While some small businesses have faced challenges in adapting to higher wages, many have managed to offset these costs through improved efficiency and increased prices. The overall effect on employment rates has been mixed, with some sectors experiencing minimal impact and others showing modest declines in job growth. Importantly, higher wages have also attracted more people into the labor market, which can help balance any reductions in job availability.

Influence on Small and Large Businesses

The influence of minimum wage increases on businesses varies significantly between small and large enterprises. Small businesses often operate on tighter margins and may find it more challenging to absorb higher labor costs. They may need to implement cost-saving measures, such as reducing hours, limiting hiring, or increasing prices. However, small businesses also benefit from higher consumer spending driven by increased wages, which can help offset some of the added costs.

Large businesses, with greater financial resources and more diverse revenue streams, are generally better positioned to handle wage increases. They can spread the additional costs across a broader base and invest in automation and efficiency improvements. Additionally, higher wages can lead to a more motivated and productive workforce, ultimately benefiting large employers through enhanced performance and reduced turnover.

Impact on Consumer Spending and Economic Growth

One of the most significant benefits of raising the minimum wage in Massachusetts is its positive impact on consumer spending and economic growth. When workers earn higher wages, they have more disposable income to spend on goods and services. This increase in consumer spending stimulates demand, driving economic activity and supporting businesses across various sectors.

Higher wages also contribute to reducing poverty and improving living standards, which can lead to better health outcomes and increased educational attainment. These social benefits further bolster economic growth by creating a more prosperous and productive population.

Studies and Research on the Economic Effects of Minimum Wage in Massachusetts

Numerous studies and research have been conducted to understand the economic effects of minimum wage increases in Massachusetts. Research by institutions such as the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and the Economic Policy Institute has provided valuable insights into how wage policies impact the state’s economy.

  • Positive Effects on Low-Income Workers: Higher minimum wages have led to significant income gains for low-wage workers, reducing poverty rates and income inequality.
  • Modest Impact on Employment: While there have been some job losses in certain sectors, the overall impact on employment has been relatively modest, with many businesses adapting successfully to higher wage standards.
  • Enhanced Consumer Spending: Increased wages have boosted consumer spending, driving demand for local businesses and contributing to economic growth.
  • Improved Worker Productivity: Higher wages have been linked to improved worker productivity, reduced absenteeism, and lower turnover rates, benefiting employers and employees alike.

The economic impact of minimum wage increases in Massachusetts is multifaceted. While challenges exist, particularly for small businesses, the overall effects have been positive, with increased consumer spending, reduced poverty, and enhanced economic growth. Ongoing research continues to shed light on the best practices for balancing fair wages with economic sustainability, ensuring that Massachusetts remains a leader in progressive labor policies.



Comparison of Massachusetts’ Minimum Wage with Neighboring States

Massachusetts vs. Neighboring States

  • Massachusetts’ minimum wage stands out when compared to neighboring states like New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. As of 2024, Massachusetts has a minimum wage of $15.00 per hour, which is one of the highest in the region. In comparison:
  • New York: The minimum wage varies by region. For instance, New York City has a minimum wage of $15.00 per hour, similar to Massachusetts, while other regions in the state have lower rates, with a gradual increase plan in place.
  • Connecticut: The minimum wage in Connecticut is set to reach $15.00 per hour by June 2023. This puts Connecticut on par with Massachusetts in terms of wage standards.
  • Rhode Island: The minimum wage in Rhode Island is scheduled to increase to $15.00 per hour by 2025, following a phased approach similar to Massachusetts.

These comparisons highlight that Massachusetts is at the forefront of setting high wage standards in the region, promoting better living conditions for its workers.

Economic Implications of Regional Wage Differences

The differences in minimum wage levels among these states have significant economic implications. States with higher minimum wages, like Massachusetts and New York, often see increased consumer spending due to higher disposable incomes among workers. This can stimulate local economies and support business growth.

However, higher wages can also lead to increased operational costs for businesses, particularly small businesses, which may struggle to absorb these costs. To mitigate this, some businesses may reduce hiring, increase prices, or invest in automation to maintain profitability. Conversely, states with lower minimum wages might attract businesses looking to minimize labor costs, potentially creating economic disparities across the region.

Cross-Border Employment Trends and Wage Competition

The variation in minimum wage rates between Massachusetts and its neighboring states can lead to cross-border employment trends and wage competition. Workers living near state borders may seek employment in states with higher minimum wages to maximize their earnings. For example, workers in Rhode Island or Connecticut might commute to Massachusetts for higher-paying jobs.

This cross-border movement can benefit workers by providing them with better wages but may create challenges for employers in states with lower minimum wages, who might face labor shortages. Additionally, businesses in higher-wage states might experience increased competition for workers, leading to wage inflation and higher operating costs.

Wage competition can also influence regional labor markets, encouraging states with lower minimum wages to consider raising their rates to retain and attract workers. This competitive dynamic can drive overall wage growth in the region, benefiting workers but posing challenges for businesses trying to balance labor costs with profitability.

The regional comparisons of minimum wage levels between Massachusetts and neighboring states like New York, Connecticut, and Rhode Island reveal a complex interplay of economic implications and cross-border employment trends. Massachusetts' leadership in setting high wage standards contributes to better living conditions for its workers and stimulates local economies, but also creates competitive pressures and operational challenges for businesses. Understanding these dynamics is crucial for policymakers and business leaders as they navigate the impacts of wage policies on regional economic health.



Future Outlook for Massachusetts Minimum Wage

Predictions for the Future of Minimum Wage in Massachusetts

The future outlook for the Massachusetts minimum wage is shaped by ongoing discussions and economic projections. With the current rate set at $15.00 per hour, there is an expectation that future adjustments will be necessary to keep pace with inflation and rising living costs. Economists predict that Massachusetts will continue to lead the way in advocating for fair wages, with potential increases tied to the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to ensure that the minimum wage reflects the true cost of living.

Some projections suggest that the minimum wage could reach $20.00 per hour by the early 2030s if current trends continue. This incremental approach helps balance the need for higher wages with the capacity of businesses to absorb these costs, ensuring a sustainable economic model.

Potential Economic and Political Factors Influencing Future Wage Adjustments

Several economic and political factors will play a crucial role in determining future wage adjustments in Massachusetts. Key economic indicators such as inflation rates, unemployment levels, and overall economic growth will influence decisions on minimum wage increases. High inflation rates, for instance, may necessitate more frequent or larger adjustments to the minimum wage to maintain workers' purchasing power.

Political factors, including legislative priorities and the composition of state government, will also significantly impact wage policy. Advocacy from labor unions and worker rights groups will likely continue to push for higher wages, while business associations may advocate for more gradual increases to avoid potential economic disruptions. The political climate, particularly the balance of power between progressive and conservative lawmakers, will shape the trajectory of minimum wage policies.

Expert Opinions and Forecasts

Experts in labor economics and public policy offer varied perspectives on the future of the Massachusetts minimum wage. Many agree that maintaining a wage that keeps up with the cost of living is essential for economic stability and worker well-being. According to analysts at the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, indexing the minimum wage to inflation is a critical step to ensure that wages do not erode over time.

Additionally, some experts highlight the importance of comprehensive wage policies that include not just base pay increases but also support measures such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and affordable housing initiatives. These complementary policies can help mitigate the economic pressures on low-wage workers and enhance the overall impact of wage increases.

Forecasts also indicate that technological advancements and shifts in the labor market will influence future wage dynamics. Automation and artificial intelligence may reduce the demand for certain low-wage jobs, potentially leading to a restructuring of the labor market. In this context, continuous adjustment of the minimum wage, along with investments in workforce development and training, will be crucial to ensure that workers are equipped to thrive in a changing economy.

The future outlook for the Massachusetts minimum wage is characterized by predictions of continued increases to address inflation and living costs, influenced by economic conditions and political dynamics. Expert opinions underscore the need for a holistic approach to wage policy, combining wage increases with broader economic support measures. This forward-looking perspective ensures that Massachusetts remains a leader in advocating for fair wages and economic justice for all workers.



FAQs: Massachusetts Minimum Wage

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts?
    As of 2024, the minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour for non-tipped employees.
  • What is Massachusetts minimum wage?
    The Massachusetts minimum wage is set at $15.00 per hour for most workers.
  • How much is minimum wage in Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts is currently $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage Massachusetts?
    Minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour as of 2024.
  • What is the Massachusetts minimum wage?
    The Massachusetts minimum wage for 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts 2023?
    In 2023, the minimum wage in Massachusetts was $14.25 per hour.
  • How much is the minimum wage in Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour as of 2024.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts 2024?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts for 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the current minimum wage in Massachusetts?
    The current minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts?
    As of 2024, the minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage for Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage for Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour in 2024.
  • How much is minimum wage Massachusetts?
    Minimum wage in Massachusetts is set at $15.00 per hour for 2024.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts is currently $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts 2024?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts in 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts in 2023?
    In 2023, the minimum wage in Massachusetts was $14.25 per hour.
  • What is Massachusetts minimum wage 2024?
    Massachusetts minimum wage in 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts for 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage in the state of Massachusetts?
    In 2024, the minimum wage in the state of Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts 2023?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts in 2023 was $14.25 per hour.
  • How much is Massachusetts minimum wage?
    As of 2024, Massachusetts minimum wage is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts in 2024?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts in 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts for 2024?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts for 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage for waitresses in Massachusetts?
    For waitresses in Massachusetts, the minimum cash wage is $6.75 per hour, with tips bringing total earnings to at least $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage near Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in neighboring states varies; for example, Connecticut’s minimum wage is $15.00 per hour as of 2023.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts now?
    Currently, the minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour as of 2024.
  • What is minimum wage for servers in Massachusetts?
    Servers in Massachusetts have a minimum cash wage of $6.75 per hour, with total earnings including tips required to reach $15.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts 2014?
    In 2014, the minimum wage in Massachusetts was $8.00 per hour.
  • When does minimum wage go up in Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts typically increases in January of each year, as scheduled by state legislation.
  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts 2014?
    In 2014, the minimum wage in Massachusetts was set at $8.00 per hour.
  • What is minimum wage in Massachusetts right now?
    As of 2024, the current minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts in 2024?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts in 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is Massachusetts minimum wage 2013?
    In 2013, the minimum wage in Massachusetts was $8.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum hourly wage in Massachusetts right now?
    The minimum hourly wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 as of 2024.
  • What is minimum wage in Boston Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Boston, Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour as of 2024.
  • What is the minimum wage in Boston Massachusetts?
    As of 2024, the minimum wage in Boston, Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is Massachusetts minimum wage 2023?
    In 2023, the Massachusetts minimum wage was $14.25 per hour.
  • What is Massachusetts minimum wage in 2024?
    The Massachusetts minimum wage in 2024 is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum hourly wage in Massachusetts?
    The minimum hourly wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 as of 2024.
  • What is the minimum wage in the state of Massachusetts?
    In 2024, the minimum wage in the state of Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour.
  • What is the minimum wage Massachusetts?
    The minimum wage in Massachusetts is $15.00 per hour in 2024.
  • When is Massachusetts minimum wage going up?
    Massachusetts minimum wage typically goes up annually in January, as scheduled by state law.
  • What is the minimum wage in Massachusetts for a waitress?
    For a waitress in Massachusetts, the minimum cash wage is $6.75 per hour, with tips bringing total earnings to at least $15.00 per hour.