Blog

Square Root Symbol (√ )

Square Root Symbol (√ ) | Find square roots | Free Square Root Finder

Published on June 30th, 2024

blog-banner

Square Root Finder

Want to find the square root of any number? Or want to know the square root of the first 10 natural numbers? Just type in your query below and hit the Get Answer button.

Square Root Symbol

The square root symbol (√) is a mathematical notation used to represent the square root of a number. This symbol is also known as the radical symbol. Its usage dates back to the 16th century when it was introduced by the mathematician Christoff Rudolff in his book "Coss."

The square root symbol comprises two main components: the radical (√) and the radicand (the number under the radical sign). For example, in √9, the number 9 is the radicand. The radical symbol indicates that we are finding a number which, when multiplied by itself, gives the radicand.

Understanding the square root symbol is essential in mathematics as it simplifies the representation of the operation of finding square roots. This notation is widely used in various fields, including algebra, geometry, and calculus, making it a fundamental concept in mathematical studies.

How to Find the Square Root of a Number

Finding the square root of a number can be achieved through several methods, each with its own steps and applications. Here, we will explore four primary methods: Prime Factorisation, Repeated Subtraction, Long Division, and Estimation.

By Prime Factorisation

  1. Step 1: Start by expressing the number as a product of its prime factors. For example, to find the square root of 36, express it as 36 = 22 * 32
  2. Step 2: Pair the prime factors in groups of two. Here, 22 and 32 are already in pairs.
  3. Step 3: Take one factor from each pair and multiply them together. 

36  = 2×3=6.

By Repeated Subtraction Method

  1. Step 1: Start with the number for which you want to find the square root. For example, to find the square root of 16, start with 16.
  2. Step 2: Subtract successive odd numbers from the original number until you reach zero. The sequence will be:  16−1=15, 15 - 3 = 12, 12−5=7, 7−7=0.
  3. Step 3: Count the number of subtractions. The square root of 16 is the number of subtractions, which in this case is 4.

By Long Division Method

  1. Step 1: Group the digits of the number in pairs, starting from the decimal point to the left and right. For example, to find the square root of 152.2756, group it as (1 52 . 27 56).
  2. Step 2: Find the largest number whose square is less than or equal to the first group. Here, the first group is 1, and the largest number is 1 (since 12 = 1).
  3. Step 3: Subtract the square of this number from the first group and bring down the next pair of digits. Continue this process of finding a suitable divisor, subtracting, and bringing down pairs of digits until the entire number is covered.
  4. Step 4: The quotient formed at each step will be the digits of the square root. For example, the square root of 152.2756 is approximately 12.34.

By Estimation Method

  1. Step 1: Identify the two perfect squares between which the number lies. For instance, if finding the square root of 50, note that it lies between  

72 = 49 and 82 = 64 

  1. Step 2: Estimate a number between 7 and 8. Let's try 7.1. Square it to see if it is close to 50. 

7 X 12 which is slightly more than 50.

  1. Step 3: Adjust the estimate accordingly and repeat the squaring process to narrow down the square root. Through iterative refinement, you will find that the square root of 50 is approximately 7.07.

Each of these methods offers a unique approach to finding the square root, making it possible to choose the one that best suits the problem at hand.

List of Perfect Squares

Here is a table of perfect squares for numbers from 1 to 1000:

NumberPerfect Square
11
24
39
416
525
636
749
864
981
10100
11121
12144
13169
14196
15225
16256
17289
18324
19361
20400
21441
22484
23529
24576
25625
26676
27729
28784
29841
30900
31961
321024
331089
341156
351225
361296
371369
381444
391521
401600
411681
421764
431849
441936
452025
462116
472209
482304
492401
502500
512601
522704
532809
542916
553025
563136
573249
583364
593481
603600
613721
623844
633969
644096
654225
664356
674489
684624
694761
704900
715041
725184
735329
745476
755625
765776
775929
786084
796241
806400
816561
826724
836889
847056
857225
867396
877569
887744
897921
908100
918281
928464
938649
948836
959025
969216
979409
989604
999801
10010000

Square Roots of the First 50 Natural Numbers

Here is a table showing the square roots of the first 50 natural numbers:

Number

Square Root

11.000
21.414
31.732
42.000
52.236
62.449
72.646
82.828
93.000
103.162
113.317
123.464
133.606
143.742
153.873
164.000
174.123
184.243
194.359
204.472
214.583
224.690
234.796
244.899
255.000
265.099
275.196
285.291
295.385
305.477
315.568
325.657
335.745
345.831
355.916
366.000
376.083
386.164
396.245
406.325
416.403
426.481
436.557
446.633
456.708
466.782
476.856
486.928
497.000
507.071

How to Find the Square Root of Decimals

Finding the square root of decimal numbers involves similar steps to those used for whole numbers, with a few additional considerations for handling the decimal point. Here are three examples to illustrate this process:

Example 1: Square Root of 0.25

  1. Step 1: Convert the decimal to a fraction if possible: 0.25 = 25 / 100 = 1 / 4
  2. Step 2: Find the square root of the fraction:  1 /4 = 1 / 4
  3. Step 3: Convert the fraction back to a decimal if necessary: 1 / 2 = 0.5 

Example 2: Square Root of 2.56

  1. Step 1: Use the long division method or a calculator to find the square root directly.
  2. Step 2: By long division, break down the decimal number into pairs: 2.56 becomes 2∣562.
  3. Step 3: Perform the long division to get the result: 2.56 = 1.6 

Example 3: Square Root of 0.0081

  1. Step 1: Convert the decimal to a fraction: 0.0081 = 81 / 10000
  2. Step 2: Find the square root of the fraction:  

81/10000 = 9/100 = 0.09

How to Find the Square Root of Negative Numbers

The square root of a negative number involves the use of imaginary numbers since the square root of a negative number is not defined in the set of real numbers. The imaginary unit, denoted as i, is used where i= -1. Here is an example:

Example 1: Square Root of -4

  1. Step 1: Recognize the negative sign and use the imaginary unit i.
  2. Step 2: Find the square root of the positive counterpart: 4 = 2
  3. Step 3: Apply the imaginary unit: -4 = 2i

Example 2: Square Root of -9

  1. Step 1: Recognize the negative sign and use the imaginary unit i.
  2. Step 2: Find the square root of the positive counterpart: 9 = 3
  3. Step 3: Apply the imaginary unit: -9 = 3i

Example 3: Square Root of -16

  1. Step 1: Recognize the negative sign and use the imaginary unit i.
  2. Step 2: Find the square root of the positive counterpart: 16 = 4
  3. Step 3: Apply the imaginary unit: -16 = 4i

By using the imaginary unit iii, the concept of square roots is extended to include negative numbers, which are otherwise not defined in the realm of real numbers.

How to Find the Square Root of Complex Numbers

Finding the square root of complex numbers involves a combination of algebraic manipulation and understanding of complex number properties. A complex number is generally represented in the form a+bi, where i is the imaginary unit (i = -1​). Here are example to illustrate this process:

Example 1: Square Root of 3+4i3 + 4i3+4i

  1. Step 1: Represent the complex number in the form z=a+bi, where z=3+4i.
  2. Step 2: Assume the square root is in the form x+yi. Then,  (x + yi)= 3+4i.
  3. Step 3: Expand the equation:  (x)2 + 2xyi + (yi)2 = 3 + 4i.
  4. Step 4: Separate the real and imaginary parts: x2 - y2 = 3 and 2xy = 4.  
  5. Step 5: Solve the system of equations:

2xy = 4 ⟹ xy = 2 ⟹ y= 2 /x

Substitute y in x- y= 3.x- (2/x)= 3 ⟹ x4 − 3x2 − 4 = 0

Solve the quadratic equation in terms of u=x2 

u2 − 3 u − 4 = 0 ⟹ (u−4)(u+1) = 0

u = 4 ⟹ x = ±2, and u = −1u = -1u = −1 is not valid for real x.

Step 6: Find the corresponding y:

  • For x=2, y=2 / 2 = 1  
  • For x=−2, y=2 / −2 = −1

Thus,  3+4i = 2+i or −2 − i

How to Find the Square Root of Fractions

Finding the square root of a fraction involves taking the square root of both the numerator and the denominator separately. Here’s an example to illustrate this process:

Example: Square Root of 16 / 25 

  1. Step 1: Write down the fraction whose square root you want to find:   16 / 25 
  2. Step 2: Find the square root of the numerator (16) and the denominator (25) separately.
    • The square root of 16 is 16 = 4.
    • The square root of 25 is 25  ​=5.
  3. Step 3: Combine the square roots of the numerator and the denominator to get the square root of the fraction.
    • Therefore, 16/25 = 4 / 5 

Thus, the square root of 16 / 25 is 4 / 5.

How to Solve the Square Root Equation

Solving square root equations involves isolating the square root on one side of the equation and then squaring both sides to eliminate the square root. Here’s a step-by-step method with an example:

Example: Solve x+5 = 3

  1. Step 1: Isolate the square root on one side of the equation.
    • x+5 = 3 
  2. Step 2: Square both sides to eliminate the square root.
    •  (x+5)2 = (3)2
    • x + 5 = 9
  3. Step 3: Solve the resulting equation.
    • x + 5 = 9 
    • x = 9 − 5 
    • x = 4 
  4. Step 4: Check the solution by substituting it back into the original equation.
    • 4+5  = 3
    • 9  ​=3
    • 3 = 3 

Properties of Square Root

Square roots have several important properties that are useful in various mathematical calculations. Here are some key properties:

  1. Non-negativity: The square root of a non-negative number is always non-negative. For example, √16 = 4.
  2. Product Property: The square root of a product is equal to the product of the square roots of the factors.
    • √ab = √ a × √ b 
    • For example, √ 36 = √ 9×4 = √ 9 × √ 4 = 3 × 2 = 6
  3. Quotient Property: The square root of a quotient is equal to the quotient of the square roots of the numerator and the denominator.
    • √ a / b = √ a / √ b ​​
  4. Square of a Square Root: The square of a square root returns the original number.
    • (√ a)2  = a
  5. Addition and Subtraction: The square root of a sum or difference of two numbers is not equal to the sum or difference of their square roots.
    • √ a+b ≠ √ a + √ b
    • √ a−b ≠ √ a − √ b

Real-World Applications of Square Roots

Square roots are used in various real-world applications across different fields such as geometry, algebra, science, and engineering. These applications demonstrate the importance of understanding and utilizing square roots in practical scenarios.

Use in Geometry

In geometry, one of the most significant applications of square roots is in the Pythagorean theorem. This theorem is fundamental for determining distances and lengths in right-angled triangles. According to the Pythagorean theorem, in a right-angled triangle, the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle) is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. This relationship is critical in numerous geometric calculations, including the design and construction of buildings, bridges, and other structures. Additionally, square roots are used to find distances between points in coordinate geometry and to calculate areas and perimeters of various geometric shapes.

Use in Algebra and Quadratic Equations

Square roots are essential in solving quadratic equations, which are polynomial equations of the second degree. The quadratic formula, which provides the solutions to the equation ax2+bx+c=0ax^2 + bx + c = 0ax2+bx+c=0, involves the square root function. Understanding how to manipulate and solve equations involving square roots is crucial in algebra, as it allows for the determination of the roots of quadratic equations. This knowledge is applied in various fields, such as physics, engineering, and economics, where quadratic equations model real-world phenomena, including projectile motion, optimization problems, and financial calculations.

Applications in Science and Engineering

Square roots play a vital role in scientific and engineering calculations. In physics, they are used to determine various physical quantities, such as distances, velocities, and accelerations. For example, the formula for the root mean square (RMS) speed of gas molecules involves the square root function. In engineering, square roots are used in stress and strain calculations, electrical circuit analysis, and material science. Understanding the application of square roots in these contexts is essential for accurate modeling, analysis, and problem-solving.

Examples of Real-World Problems Solved Using Square Roots

Architecture and Construction: In architecture and construction, square roots are used to calculate the dimensions and stability of structural components. For example, the Pythagorean theorem is used to determine the lengths of diagonal braces in rectangular frames, ensuring that buildings and structures are stable and secure. Accurate calculations of lengths, areas, and volumes are crucial for designing safe and functional buildings and infrastructure.

Finance: In finance, square roots are used to estimate the standard deviation of investment returns. The standard deviation is a measure of the amount of variation or dispersion in a set of values. It is calculated by taking the square root of the variance, which is the average of the squared differences from the mean. Understanding the standard deviation helps investors assess the risk and volatility of their investments, enabling them to make informed financial decisions.

Medicine: In medicine, square roots are used to determine the dosage of medication based on body surface area (BSA). The BSA is often calculated using the square root of the product of a person's height and weight. Accurate dosage calculations are essential for ensuring that patients receive the correct amount of medication, minimizing the risk of overdose or underdose.

Common Mistakes and Misconceptions

Understanding square roots is crucial for solving various mathematical problems, but some common mistakes and misconceptions can lead to errors. Here are some of the frequent pitfalls and tips to avoid them.

Common Errors in Calculating and Simplifying Square Roots

  1. Incorrect Simplification:
    • Mistake: Assuming a + b  = a  + b
    • Correction: This is incorrect. For example,  4 + 9   4  + 9 
    • Instead, 13 ≈ 3.61 not 2 + 3 = 5.
  2. Wrong Factorization:
    • Mistake: Incorrectly breaking down numbers into their prime factors.
    • Correction: Ensure correct factorization. 

For example, 72  = 36 X2  = 62​, not 72 = 8.49 (incorrect method).

  1. Forgetting the Imaginary Unit:
    • Mistake: Trying to find the square root of a negative number without using iii.
    • Correction: Remember that −1=i\sqrt{-1} = i−1​=i. For example, −9=3i\sqrt{-9} = 3i−9​=3i, not undefined.
  2. Ignoring Simplification:
    • Mistake: Leaving answers in a non-simplified form.
    • Correction: Simplify wherever possible. For example, 50=25×2=52\sqrt{50} = \sqrt{25 \times 2} = 5\sqrt{2}50​=25×2​=52​.

Tips for Avoiding These Mistakes

  1. Understand the Properties: Familiarize yourself with the properties of square roots and ensure you apply them correctly.
  2. Check Your Work: Always verify your calculations, especially when simplifying square roots.
  3. Practice: Regular practice with different types of problems helps solidify your understanding and prevent mistakes.
  4. Use Reliable Resources: Refer to textbooks, online tutorials, and educational videos to reinforce your understanding of square roots.

Fun Facts and Interesting Tidbits

The square root symbol and the concept of square roots have an intriguing history and some fascinating trivia.

Trivia About the Square Root Symbol

  1. Origin of the Symbol (√): The square root symbol (√) has its origins in the 16th century. It was first used by the German mathematician Christoff Rudolff in his book "Coss" published in 1525.
  2. The Radical Symbol: The square root symbol is also known as the radical sign. The word "radical" comes from the Latin word "radix," meaning root.
  3. Not Just for Square Roots: The radical symbol can be modified to represent other roots. For example, the cube root of 8 is written as 83\sqrt[3]{8}38​.

Historical Anecdotes and Interesting Stories

  1. Ancient Calculations: The ancient Babylonians were among the first to calculate square roots. They used a method similar to the long division method we use today, as evidenced by clay tablets dating back to 1800 BCE.
  2. Pythagoras and His Theorem: Pythagoras, an ancient Greek mathematician, is best known for the Pythagorean theorem, which involves the square root function. Although the theorem was known to the Babylonians over a thousand years before Pythagoras, he is often credited with its popularization.
  3. Square Roots in Ancient Egypt: The ancient Egyptians used square roots in their construction projects. The Rhind Mathematical Papyrus, dating back to around 1650 BCE, contains problems and solutions involving square roots.
  4. Medieval Mathematics: In medieval Europe, mathematicians like Leonardo of Pisa (Fibonacci) worked on solving quadratic equations, which inherently involve square roots. His book "Liber Abaci," published in 1202, introduced the Hindu-Arabic numeral system to Europe, facilitating more advanced mathematical calculations.

These fun facts and historical anecdotes highlight the rich history and widespread use of square roots in various cultures and eras. Understanding the origins and development of the square root symbol adds depth to our appreciation of this fundamental mathematical concept.

How to Insert the Square Root Symbol

Inserting the square root symbol (√) can be done in various software and devices. Here’s how to do it on some of the most common platforms:

In Microsoft Word

  1. Using the Symbol Menu:
    • Go to the "Insert" tab.
    • Click on "Symbol" in the Symbols group.
    • Select "More Symbols."
    • Find the square root symbol (√) in the list, select it, and click "Insert."
  2. Using Keyboard Shortcuts:
    • Type 221A and then press AltX.

In Microsoft Excel

  1. Using the Symbol Menu:
    • Click on the cell where you want to insert the symbol.
    • Go to the "Insert" tab.
    • Click on "Symbol."
    • Find the square root symbol (√) in the list, select it, and click "Insert."
  2. Using Keyboard Shortcuts:
    • Type 221A in the cell and then press AltX.

In Microsoft PowerPoint

  1. Using the Symbol Menu:
    • Go to the slide where you want to insert the symbol.
    • Click on the "Insert" tab.
    • Click "Symbol" in the Symbols group.
    • Select "More Symbols."
    • Find the square root symbol (√) in the list, select it, and click "Insert."
  2. Using Keyboard Shortcuts:
    • Type 221A and then press AltX.

In Google Docs

  1. Using the Insert Menu:
    • Go to the "Insert" menu.
    • Select "Special characters."
    • In the search box, type "square root" and select the symbol from the list.
  2. Using Keyboard Shortcuts (if available):
    • On a Mac, press ControlCommandSpace to open the character viewer and search for the square root symbol.

In Google Sheets

  1. Using the Insert Menu:
    • Click on the cell where you want to insert the symbol.
    • Go to the "Insert" menu.
    • Select "Special characters."
    • In the search box, type "square root" and select the symbol from the list.

In Google Slides

  1. Using the Insert Menu:
    • Go to the slide where you want to insert the symbol.
    • Click on the "Insert" menu.
    • Select "Special characters."
    • In the search box, type "square root" and select the symbol from the list.

On Mac

  1. Using the Character Viewer:
    • Press ControlCommandSpace to open the character viewer.
    • In the search box, type "square root."
    • Double-click the square root symbol (√) to insert it.
  2. Using Keyboard Shortcuts:
    • Type OptionV to insert the square root symbol.

On iPhone

  1. Using the Emoji & Symbol Keyboard:
    • Tap the text field where you want to insert the symbol.
    • Tap the globe or smiley face icon to switch to the emoji keyboard.
    • Tap the symbols (Ω) button.
    • Find and tap the square root symbol (√).
  2. Using Text Replacement:
    • Go to "Settings" > "General" > "Keyboard" > "Text Replacement."
    • Tap the "+" button, enter the square root symbol in the "Phrase" field, and a shortcut in the "Shortcut" field.
    • Type the shortcut in any text field to insert the symbol.

On Android

  1. Using the Keyboard:
    • Tap the text field where you want to insert the symbol.
    • Switch to the numeric and symbols keyboard by tapping ?123 or a similar button.
    • Look for the square root symbol (√) in the list of symbols and tap it.
  2. Using Google Keyboard (Gboard):
    • Tap the text field where you want to insert the symbol.
    • Press and hold the ^ (caret) symbol until the additional symbols appear.
    • Select the square root symbol (√) from the options.

By following these steps, you can easily insert the square root symbol (√) across various platforms and devices, enhancing your documents, spreadsheets, presentations, and text entries.

Conclusion

Understanding and using the square root symbol (√) is fundamental in various fields of mathematics and beyond. From basic geometry and algebra to complex scientific and engineering applications, square roots play a crucial role. This comprehensive guide has covered essential aspects of square roots, including their calculation methods, historical background, real-world applications, common mistakes, and how to insert the symbol in different platforms.

By mastering the properties and uses of square roots, you can solve numerous mathematical problems more effectively and appreciate the depth of this mathematical concept. Whether you are a student, professional, or simply a math enthusiast, the knowledge of square roots enriches your analytical skills and supports a wide range of practical applications in everyday life.

Remember, practice and familiarity with different methods and tools are key to avoiding common mistakes and misconceptions. Leveraging technology, such as calculators and software applications, can further enhance your efficiency and accuracy when working with square roots.

In conclusion, square roots are not just a mathematical operation but a gateway to understanding more complex and fascinating aspects of mathematics and its applications in the real world. Embrace this knowledge, apply it confidently, and explore the endless possibilities it offers in various domains.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Square Root Symbol

What is the square root symbol?

The square root symbol (√) is a mathematical notation used to represent the square root of a number. It is also known as the radical symbol.

How to type the square root symbol?

To type the square root symbol, you can use the following methods depending on your platform:

  • Windows: Hold Alt and type 251 on the numeric keypad.
  • Mac: Press OptionV.
  • HTML: Use √.

How to make the square root symbol?

You can make the square root symbol by using keyboard shortcuts or by inserting it from the symbol menu in various applications. For example:

  • In Microsoft Word, go to "Insert" > "Symbol" > "More Symbols" and select the square root symbol.

What is the symbol for the square root?

The symbol for square root is √. It is used to denote the square root operation in mathematics.

How to type the square root symbol on a Chromebook?

To type the square root symbol on a Chromebook, use the Unicode input:

  • Press CtrlShiftU, release, and then type 221A. Press Enter to insert the symbol.

How to do the square root symbol?

To do the square root symbol in text, you can use keyboard shortcuts or insert it from the symbol menu of the application you are using.

What does the square root symbol look like?

The square root symbol looks like a checkmark with a horizontal line extending to the right: √.

How to insert the square root symbol in Word?

In Microsoft Word, you can insert the square root symbol by:

  • Going to the "Insert" tab.
  • Clicking on "Symbol" in the Symbols group.
  • Selecting "More Symbols" and choosing the square root symbol from the list.

How to get the square root symbol?

You can get the square root symbol by using keyboard shortcuts, inserting it from the symbol menu, or copying it from another source and pasting it where needed.

How to type a square root symbol?

To type a square root symbol:

  • Windows: Hold Alt and type 251 on the numeric keypad.
  • Mac: Press OptionV.

How do you type the square root symbol?

You can type the square root symbol using platform-specific shortcuts or by inserting it from the symbol menu in various applications.

How to make the square root symbol on Mac?

To make the square root symbol on a Mac, press OptionV.

How to do the square root symbol on Mac?

To do the square root symbol on a Mac, use the keyboard shortcut OptionV.

How to write the square root symbol?

You can write the square root symbol using the appropriate keyboard shortcuts for your device or by inserting it from the symbol menu.

How to get the square root symbol on Mac?

To get the square root symbol on a Mac, press OptionV.

How do you type square root symbols on Mac?

To type the square root symbol on a Mac, press OptionV.

How to make a square root symbol on a Chromebook?

To make the square root symbol on a Chromebook, press CtrlShiftU, release, type 221A, and press Enter.

How to do square root symbol on Chromebook?

To do the square root symbol on a Chromebook, press CtrlShiftU, release, type 221A, and press Enter.

How do you type the square root symbol on the keyboard?

To type the square root symbol on a keyboard:

  • Windows: Hold Alt and type 251 on the numeric keypad.
  • Mac: Press OptionV.

What is the square root symbol on the keyboard?

The square root symbol on the keyboard can be typed by using Alt251 on Windows or OptionV on Mac.

How to put the square root symbol?

To put the square root symbol in the text, use the relevant keyboard shortcut for your device or insert it from the symbol menu.

How to do the square root symbol on Mac?

To do the square root symbol on Mac, press OptionV.

Where is the square root symbol on a keyboard?

The square root symbol is not directly on the keyboard but can be typed using keyboard shortcuts:

  • Windows: Hold Alt and type 251.
  • Mac: Press OptionV.

How to type the square root symbol on Mac?

To type the square root symbol on Mac, press OptionV.

How do you put a square root symbol on the computer?

To put a square root symbol on the computer, use the appropriate keyboard shortcut or insert it from the symbol menu of the application you are using.

What is the square root symbol?

The square root symbol (√) represents the square root operation in mathematics.

How to do square root symbol on keyboard?

To do the square root symbol on the keyboard:

  • Windows: Hold Alt and type 251.
  • Mac: Press OptionV.

How do I type a square root symbol?

To type a square root symbol:

  • Windows: Hold Alt and type 251.
  • Mac: Press OptionV.

How to insert square root symbol in Excel?

In Microsoft Excel, you can insert the square root symbol by:

  • Clicking on the cell where you want to insert the symbol.
  • Going to the "Insert" tab.
  • Clicking on "Symbol" and selecting the square root symbol from the list.

How to get the square root symbol?

You can get the square root symbol by using keyboard shortcuts or inserting it from the symbol menu in various applications.

How do I type the square root symbol?

To type the square root symbol:

  • Windows: Hold Alt and type 251.
  • Mac: Press OptionV.

How to do square root symbol on Chromebook?

To do the square root symbol on a Chromebook, press CtrlShiftU, release, type 221A, and press Enter.

How to write square root without symbol?

To write square root without the symbol, you can use the text format "sqrt()". For example, "sqrt(16)" represents the square root of 16.

How to insert square root symbol?

To insert the square root symbol, use the appropriate keyboard shortcut or insert it from the symbol menu in the application you are using.

How to insert square root symbol in Google Docs?

In Google Docs, insert the square root symbol by:

  • Going to the "Insert" menu.
  • Selecting "Special characters."
  • Typing "square root" in the search box and selecting the symbol.

How to get square root symbol on Chromebook?

To get the square root symbol on a Chromebook, press CtrlShiftU, release, type 221A, and press Enter.

What is the square root symbol called?

The square root symbol is called the radical symbol.

How to make the square root symbol on Chromebook?

To make the square root symbol on a Chromebook, press CtrlShiftU, release, type 221A, and press Enter.

What is the square root symbol on a calculator?

The square root symbol on a calculator is typically represented by the symbol √ or a button labeled "sqrt".

How to insert a square root symbol in Word?

To insert a square root symbol in Word:

  • Go to the "Insert" tab.
  • Click on "Symbol."
  • Select "More Symbols" and choose the square root symbol from the list.

How to enter a square root symbol?

To enter a square root symbol, use the relevant keyboard shortcut for your device or insert it from the symbol menu in your application.

What is a square root symbol?

The square root symbol (√) is used to denote the square root operation in mathematics.

How to get the square root symbol on Chromebook?

To get the square root symbol on a Chromebook, press CtrlShiftU, release, type 221A, and press Enter.


Authors

author

Soujanya Varada

As a technical content writer and social media strategist, Soujanya develops and manages strategies at HireQuotient. With strong technical background and years of experience in content management, she looks for opportunities to flourish in the digital space. Soujanya is also a dance fanatic and believes in spreading light!

Scroll Image

Hire the best without stress

Ask us how
hq-logo

Never Miss The Updates

We cover all recruitment, talent analytics, L&D, DEI, pre-employment, candidate screening, and hiring tools. Join our force & subscribe now!

Like/ dislike something or want to co-author an article? Drop us a note!

Stay On Top Of Everything In HR