Blog

Obtuse Angle Calculator

Obtuse Angle Calculator | Definition, Examples, and Applications

Published on June 30th, 2024

blog-banner

Obtuse Angle Calculator

Accurately calculate and understand Obtuse Angles with definitions, examples, and applications.

What is an Obtuse Angle?

An obtuse angle is an angle that measures more than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees. This range places obtuse angles between right angles, which are exactly 90 degrees, and straight angles, which are exactly 180 degrees. Understanding the concept of an obtuse angle is essential in various fields of mathematics, physics, engineering, and even art and design, as it helps in comprehending shapes, structures, and various forms of graphical representations.

In geometry, an obtuse angle is defined as any angle between 90° and 180°. It is larger than a right angle but smaller than a straight angle. Obtuse angles can be found in various geometric shapes and figures, including triangles, polygons, and even in everyday objects.

For example, in an obtuse triangle, one of the interior angles is obtuse, meaning it is greater than 90°. This characteristic affects the properties and classifications of the triangle. An obtuse triangle always has one obtuse angle and two acute angles (angles less than 90°).

Characteristics of an Obtuse Angle

  1. Range of Measurement: Obtuse angles always measure between 90° and 180°. This is the primary characteristic that differentiates them from acute angles (less than 90°) and right angles (exactly 90°).
  2. Visual Representation: An obtuse angle is visually represented as a wide opening between two lines or segments. The broader the opening, the closer the angle is to 180°.
  3. Calculation and Identification: Obtuse angles are often calculated and identified in various geometric problems. For instance, if you have a triangle and two of its angles are known, you can easily determine if the third angle is obtuse by ensuring its measurement falls within the obtuse range.

Applications of Obtuse Angles

Obtuse angles have practical applications in several fields:

  1. Architecture and Construction: In architecture, obtuse angles can be used in the design of structures to create visually appealing and stable buildings. They are often seen in the design of roofs, bridges, and other architectural elements that require specific angle measurements for both aesthetics and functionality.
  2. Art and Design: Artists and designers use obtuse angles to create dynamic and interesting compositions. The wide spread of obtuse angles can convey a sense of openness and expansiveness in a piece of art.
  3. Engineering: Engineers utilize obtuse angles in designing mechanical parts and systems where specific angular measurements are crucial for the operation and efficiency of machines and structures.
  4. Everyday Objects: Many everyday objects incorporate obtuse angles in their design. For instance, the angle between the backrest and the seat of a reclining chair is typically obtuse, providing comfort and support.

Examples of Obtuse Angles

  1. Triangle: In an obtuse triangle, one angle is obtuse. For example, a triangle with angles measuring 120°, 30°, and 30° is an obtuse triangle.
  2. Polygon: In polygons, especially those with more than four sides, obtuse angles are often present. For instance, a regular pentagon has interior angles that are all obtuse, each measuring 108°.
  3. Real-life objects: The hands of a clock form obtuse angles at various times. For example, at 10:15, the angle between the hour hand and the minute hand is obtuse.

Understanding obtuse angles is fundamental to mastering geometry and appreciating the intricacies of various shapes and structures around us. Their applications span across multiple disciplines, making them an essential concept in both academic studies and practical real-world scenarios.

Obtuse Angle Degree

How much is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle measures between 90 and 180 degrees. This measurement distinguishes obtuse angles from right angles, which are exactly 90 degrees, and straight angles, which are exactly 180 degrees. The obtuse angle's range allows it to have various applications in different fields, from geometry and trigonometry to everyday practical uses.

Obtuse angle measure

The measure of an obtuse angle ranges from 91° to 179°. This broad range encompasses many different angles, each with its unique properties and applications. When measuring an obtuse angle, it's important to ensure the angle falls within this range to accurately classify it as obtuse. The wide spread of an obtuse angle can make it easy to recognize, especially in geometric figures and real-life contexts.

Obtuse Angle vs. Acute Angle

Understanding the differences between obtuse and acute angles is crucial for solving geometric problems and recognizing these angles in various contexts.

  • Obtuse Angle: An obtuse angle is any angle that is larger than 90° but less than 180°. This means its measurement will always fall between 91° and 179°. Obtuse angles are often associated with a more "open" or "spread out" appearance compared to acute angles. In practical terms, obtuse angles can be seen in various structural designs, artistic compositions, and mechanical components.
  • Acute Angle: In contrast, an acute angle is any angle that is less than 90°. This means its measurement ranges from just above 0° up to 89°. Acute angles are typically sharper and more "closed" in appearance. They are commonly found in geometric shapes like triangles and polygons, as well as in everyday objects and designs that require precise and sharp angles.

Examples and Visual Differences

  1. Visual Comparison: When visually comparing an obtuse angle to an acute angle, the obtuse angle will appear wider and more spread out. For example, if you compare a 120° angle (obtuse) to a 45° angle (acute), the difference in their openness is immediately apparent.
  2. Geometric Shapes: In geometric figures, obtuse and acute angles play distinct roles. An obtuse triangle will always have one obtuse angle and two acute angles, while an acute triangle has all three angles as acute. Understanding these differences helps in classifying and solving problems related to these shapes.
  3. Practical Applications: In practical applications, obtuse angles might be used in the design of ramps or slopes, where a gentle incline is needed. Acute angles, on the other hand, might be used in the design of cutting tools, where a sharp edge is essential.

Key Differences

  • Range of Measurement:
    • Obtuse Angle: 91° to 179°
    • Acute Angle: 0° to 89°
  • Appearance:
    • Obtuse Angle: Wide and open
    • Acute Angle: Sharp and narrow
  • Geometric Presence:
    • Obtuse Angle: Found in obtuse triangles, polygons, and various structural designs
    • Acute Angle: Found in acute triangles, sharp-edged tools, and precise design elements

Understanding the distinction between obtuse and acute angles is fundamental in both academic learning and practical applications. This knowledge aids in solving geometric problems, designing structures and objects, and appreciating the diverse range of angles that shape our world.

Obtuse Angle Examples

Obtuse angle in real life

Obtuse angles are prevalent in various aspects of everyday life and can be observed in numerous practical contexts. Here are a few examples:

  1. Clock Hands: When the hands of a clock show times such as 10:10 or 2:10, they form obtuse angles. For instance, at 10:10, the angle between the hour and minute hands is greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees.
  2. Roof Trusses: In construction and architecture, obtuse angles are often found in the design of certain roof trusses. These angles contribute to the structural integrity and aesthetic appeal of the roof. For example, the roof of a house might have an obtuse angle to allow for better water runoff and a more spacious attic.
  3. Art and Architecture: Many types of art and architectural designs incorporate obtuse angles to create visually appealing and structurally sound forms. The use of obtuse angles can be seen in the design of bridges, where the angles provide strength and stability, and in modern art, where they add dynamic and interesting shapes.
  4. Furniture Design: Some furniture pieces, like chairs and tables, might incorporate obtuse angles for ergonomic and aesthetic purposes. For example, the backrest of a reclining chair often forms an obtuse angle with the seat to provide comfort and support.
  5. Everyday Objects: Various everyday objects, such as scissors, might include obtuse angles in their design to ensure proper function and ease of use. The handles of scissors, when fully open, form an obtuse angle to facilitate a comfortable grip and effective cutting action.

Obtuse Angle in Geometry

In geometry, an obtuse triangle will have one angle measuring more than 90°, and in such triangles, the sine and cosine ratios of angles can provide unique properties and relationships. Let's explore this concept further:

  1. Obtuse Triangle Characteristics: An obtuse triangle has one angle greater than 90°, known as the obtuse angle, and the other two angles are acute (less than 90°). This unique configuration affects the trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, and tangent) of the angles within the triangle.
  2. Sine and Cosine Ratios: For an angle in a right-angled triangle, the sine ratio is the length of the opposite side divided by the hypotenuse, while the cosine ratio is the length of the adjacent side divided by the hypotenuse. In obtuse triangles, these trigonometric ratios can exhibit interesting properties. For example, in an obtuse triangle, the sine of the obtuse angle is positive, but the cosine of the same angle is negative, reflecting the angle's position in the coordinate plane.
  3. Special Case of Sine and Cosine Equality: To identify a triangle where the sine and cosine ratios are equal, consider the properties of angles. The equality of sine and cosine ratios implies that the angle in question is 45° in a right triangle. However, in an obtuse triangle, this scenario does not naturally occur since the obtuse angle is always greater than 90°. Therefore, there isn't a triangle where the obtuse angle itself has equal sine and cosine ratios.
  4. Trigonometric Properties in Obtuse Triangles: Instead of equal sine and cosine ratios, obtuse triangles often exhibit interesting relationships among their angles and sides. For example, the Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines are particularly useful in solving for unknown sides and angles in obtuse triangles, providing insights into the triangle's geometry.

By understanding these principles, one can appreciate the unique properties and applications of obtuse angles both in geometric contexts and in everyday life. Whether calculating angles in trigonometry or observing obtuse angles in architecture and design, the concept of obtuse angles is integral to a wide range of disciplines.

Obtuse Angle in Triangles

Obtuse Angle Triangle

An obtuse triangle is a triangle where one of the angles is an obtuse angle (greater than 90°). This type of triangle has several unique properties:

  1. Largest Side Opposite the Obtuse Angle: In an obtuse triangle, the side opposite the obtuse angle is always the longest side of the triangle. This is due to the larger angle creating a longer span between its adjacent vertices.
  2. The sum of Angles: Like all triangles, the sum of the internal angles in an obtuse triangle is 180°. With one angle being greater than 90°, the other two angles must be acute (less than 90°).
  3. Types of Obtuse Triangles: Obtuse triangles can be scalene (all sides and angles are different) or isosceles (two sides and two angles are equal), but they cannot be equilateral (all sides and angles are equal) since all angles in an equilateral triangle are 60°.
  4. Circumcircle: The circumcircle of an obtuse triangle (the circle passing through all three vertices) will have its center located outside the triangle. This is in contrast to acute and right triangles, where the circumcircle's center is inside or on the triangle, respectively.
  5. Altitude Properties: The altitude (a perpendicular line from a vertex to the opposite side) from the vertex of the obtuse angle will fall outside the triangle, extending the opposite side. This creates a unique configuration compared to altitudes in acute and right triangles.

Obtuse Angle Parallelogram

In a parallelogram, if one of the angles is obtuse, the opposite angle will also be obtuse, while the adjacent angles will be acute. This configuration results in the following properties:

  1. Opposite Angles: Opposite angles in a parallelogram are equal. Thus, if one angle is obtuse, its opposite angle must also be obtuse, maintaining the parallelogram's symmetry.
  2. Adjacent Angles: The adjacent angles in a parallelogram are supplementary, meaning they add up to 180°. If one angle is obtuse, its adjacent angles will be acute, ensuring the sum of each pair of adjacent angles is 180°.
  3. Side Lengths and Diagonals: The sides opposite to the obtuse angles are typically longer than those opposite to the acute angles. The diagonals of the parallelogram will bisect each other, and the angle formed by the intersection of the diagonals can provide further insights into the parallelogram's geometric properties.

Obtuse Angle Trapezoid

An obtuse angle trapezoid has at least one obtuse angle, typically leading to interesting geometric properties and applications:

  1. Angle Configuration: In an obtuse angle trapezoid, at least one of the angles between the bases (the parallel sides) and the non-parallel sides is obtuse. This can create a distinctive shape with a wider and more open appearance.
  2. Types of Trapezoids: Obtuse angle trapezoids can vary in their configurations. An isosceles trapezoid can have obtuse angles if the non-parallel sides (legs) are of equal length and the angles between the bases and the legs are obtuse. Asymmetric trapezoids can also feature obtuse angles with varying side lengths.
  3. Applications: Obtuse angle trapezoids can be seen in various real-life applications, such as bridge designs, where the wider base provides stability and support. They are also used in architectural elements to create unique and aesthetically pleasing structures.
  4. Properties of Diagonals: The diagonals of an obtuse angle trapezoid have unique properties. They intersect at a point that divides each diagonal into segments that can be analyzed using geometric principles. The length of the diagonals and their intersection points can provide further insights into the trapezoid's properties.

Understanding obtuse angles and their applications in various geometric shapes, such as triangles, parallelograms, and trapezoids, enhances our comprehension of both theoretical and practical aspects of geometry. These shapes and angles are integral to many fields, from mathematics and engineering to art and architecture, demonstrating the versatility and importance of obtuse angles in our world.

Applications of Obtuse Angles

How obtuse angles are used in different fields?

Obtuse angles are utilized across various fields such as architecture, design, and engineering to achieve specific aesthetic effects or structural elements. Here are some practical applications:

  1. Architecture: In architecture, obtuse angles are often used to create unique and visually appealing structures. For instance, modern buildings might incorporate obtuse angles in their design to break away from traditional right-angled forms, providing a sense of openness and innovation. Roofs with obtuse angles are common in regions with heavy rainfall or snow, as the angles facilitate better water runoff and snow shedding.
  2. Interior Design: Interior designers use obtuse angles to create dynamic and engaging spaces. Furniture arrangements, room layouts, and decorative elements with obtuse angles can make a space feel more expansive and interesting. For example, a room with walls that meet at obtuse angles can create a more open and inviting atmosphere.
  3. Engineering: Engineers use obtuse angles in various structural elements to enhance stability and functionality. Bridges, for example, may feature obtuse angles in their truss designs to distribute loads more efficiently and provide better support. In mechanical engineering, components with obtuse angles can be designed to fit together seamlessly, ensuring the smooth operation of machines and devices.
  4. Art and Sculpture: Artists and sculptors often incorporate obtuse angles in their works to add depth, perspective, and complexity. Obtuse angles can create a sense of movement and flow in a piece of art, drawing the viewer's eye and adding to the overall aesthetic appeal.
  5. Urban Planning: Urban planners might use obtuse angles in the layout of streets, parks, and public spaces to improve traffic flow, enhance visual appeal, and create more engaging environments. For example, a city park designed with paths and walkways that meet at obtuse angles can provide a more natural and leisurely experience for visitors.

How Obtuse Angle is there in Right Angle Triangles?

While right-angle triangles do not inherently contain obtuse angles, the properties of obtuse angles can be applied in related trigonometric calculations and applications. Here's how:

  1. Trigonometric Calculations: In trigonometry, the concepts and ratios involving obtuse angles can be used to solve problems related to right-angle triangles. For instance, the sine, cosine, and tangent functions can be extended to obtuse angles to determine the relationships between different sides and angles in more complex geometric configurations.
  2. Law of Sines and Law of Cosines: These laws are fundamental in solving problems involving triangles, including those with obtuse angles. The Law of Sines and the Law of Cosines allow for the calculation of unknown sides and angles in obtuse triangles, which can be applied to understand and solve right-angle triangle problems in broader contexts.
  3. Practical Applications in Right-Angle Triangles: In practical applications, such as engineering and construction, understanding the properties of obtuse angles can help in designing components and structures that involve right-angle triangles. For example, in the construction of ramps or inclined planes, the obtuse angle properties can inform the design to ensure stability and proper load distribution.
  4. Complex Geometric Shapes: When dealing with complex geometric shapes that incorporate both right-angle and obtuse-angle triangles, the ratios and properties of obtuse angles are essential for accurate calculations and designs. This is particularly relevant in fields like architecture and engineering, where precise measurements and structural integrity are crucial.

By understanding and applying the properties of obtuse angles in various fields and contexts, professionals can create innovative designs, solve complex problems, and enhance the functionality and aesthetic appeal of their projects. The versatility of obtuse angles makes them a valuable tool in both theoretical and practical applications.

Obtuse Angle Calculator

Learn how to input values and calculate obtuse angles using our user-friendly obtuse angle calculator. Follow these steps for accurate and efficient calculations:

  1. Select the Calculation Method:
    • Begin by selecting the method you want to use for your calculation from the drop-down menu. Options include:
      • Base and height
      • Three sides (SSS)
      • Two sides + angle between (SAS)
      • Two angles + side between (ASA)
  2. Input the Base and Height:
    • If you choose the "base and height" method, you will see input fields for the base and height of the triangle.
    • Enter the base length in the "Base" field and the height in the "Height" field. Ensure the units (e.g., cm) are correctly selected from the drop-down menu.
  3. Calculate the Area:
    • Once you have entered the base and height, the calculator will automatically compute the area of the obtuse triangle.
    • The result will be displayed in the "Area" field in square units (e.g., cm²).
  4. Using Other Methods:
    • For the "three sides (SSS)" method, input the lengths of all three sides of the triangle.
    • For the "two sides + angle between (SAS)" method, input the lengths of the two sides and the measure of the included angle.
    • For the "two angles + side between (ASA)" method, input the measures of the two angles and the length of the included side.
    • The calculator will use these inputs to determine the area and other relevant properties of the obtuse triangle.
  5. Review Your Results:
    • Check the computed values in the output fields. The calculator provides precise and quick results, making it an efficient tool for solving obtuse angle problems.
  6. Practical Applications:
    • Use the obtained results for various applications such as geometric problem-solving, construction planning, or design projects.

By following these simple steps, you can easily calculate obtuse angles and related properties using our obtuse angle calculator. This tool is designed to provide accurate and reliable results, simplifying your work with obtuse angles in various contexts.

Examples of Calculations

Here are step-by-step examples demonstrating how to calculate obtuse angles in different scenarios using the obtuse angle calculator.

Example 1: Calculating the Area Using Base and Height

Scenario: You have an obtuse triangle with a base of 10 cm and a height of 5 cm. You need to calculate the area.

  1. Select the Calculation Method:
    • Choose "base and height" from the drop-down menu.
  2. Input the Values:
    • Enter the base length: 10 cm
    • Enter the height: 5 cm
  3. Calculate the Area: The calculator will use the formula for the area of a triangle: Area=1 / 2 × base × height

Substituting the given values: Area=1 / 2×10 cm×5 cm=25 cm 

4. Result: The area of the obtuse triangle is 25 cm².

Example 2: Calculating the Area Using Three Sides (SSS)

Scenario: You have an obtuse triangle with sides measuring 7 cm, 24 cm, and 25 cm. You need to calculate the area.

  1. Select the Calculation Method:
    • Choose "three sides (SSS)" from the drop-down menu.
  2. Input the Values:
    • Enter the lengths of the three sides: 7 cm, 24 cm, and 25 cm
  3. Calculate the Area:
    • The calculator will use Heron's formula for the area of a triangle with sides aaa, bbb, and ccc. 
    • S = (a+b+c​) / 2

Area= s(s−a)(s−b)(s−c)​

S = (7+24+25​ ) / 2 =28cm

Area = 28(28−7)(28−24)(28−25)​ = 28×21×4×3​ = 7056​ = 84cm2

4. Result:

  • The area of the obtuse triangle is 84 cm².

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Obtuse Angel

What is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is an angle that measures more than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees. It is larger than a right angle (which measures exactly 90 degrees) and smaller than a straight angle (which measures exactly 180 degrees). In geometry, obtuse angles are commonly found in various shapes and structures, providing unique properties and applications.

What does obtuse mean in math?

In mathematics, the term "obtuse" is used to describe an angle that is greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees. Obtuse angles are found in various geometric shapes, including triangles, polygons, and certain types of quadrilaterals. The concept of obtuse angles is essential for understanding and solving geometric problems.

What is a obtuse angle?

A obtuse angle is another way of referring to an obtuse angle, which is an angle that measures between 90 and 180 degrees. These angles are wider than right angles and can be found in various geometric figures and practical applications, such as architectural designs and mechanical components.

Triangle QRS has the angle measures shown. What is the measure of the obtuse angle? 18, 54, 108, 216

In triangle QRS, the obtuse angle is the one that measures more than 90 degrees. Among the given options, the angle measuring 108 degrees is the obtuse angle, as it is the only angle that falls within the range of 90 to 180 degrees.

What does an obtuse angle look like?

An obtuse angle appears as a wide opening between two lines or segments, creating a visually larger spread than a right angle. It is more open and expansive, making it easily distinguishable from acute and right angles. In practical terms, an obtuse angle can be seen in various architectural and design elements, adding to their visual appeal and functionality.

How many degrees is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle measures between 90 and 180 degrees. Specifically, it can range from just over 90 degrees to just under 180 degrees. This broad range distinguishes obtuse angles from acute angles (less than 90 degrees) and straight angles (exactly 180 degrees).

Which angle is obtuse?

An obtuse angle is any angle that measures more than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees. For example, angles measuring 100 degrees, 120 degrees, and 150 degrees are all obtuse angles. These angles are larger than right angles and are commonly found in various geometric shapes and structures.

What degree is an obtuse angle?

The degree of an obtuse angle ranges from just above 90 degrees to just below 180 degrees. This range includes any angle that is larger than a right angle but smaller than a straight angle, making obtuse angles a crucial concept in geometry and practical applications.

What shape has an obtuse angle?

Several shapes can have obtuse angles, including obtuse triangles, certain types of quadrilaterals, and irregular polygons. For instance, an obtuse triangle always has one angle that measures more than 90 degrees, while shapes like parallelograms and trapezoids can also feature obtuse angles depending on their specific configurations.

How does an obtuse angle look like?

An obtuse angle looks like a wide and open angle, larger than a right angle. It creates a broad span between its two sides, making it easily distinguishable from acute angles (sharp and narrow) and right angles (exactly 90 degrees). Obtuse angles are commonly seen in various geometric shapes and practical designs, providing unique visual and structural characteristics.

What does an obtuse angle measure?

An obtuse angle measures between 90 and 180 degrees. This measurement range makes obtuse angles larger than right angles and smaller than straight angles, allowing them to play a significant role in both theoretical and practical applications in geometry and beyond.

How much is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle measures more than 90 degrees and less than 180 degrees. This range of measurement makes obtuse angles larger than right angles (90 degrees) and smaller than straight angles (180 degrees). The specific measurement of an obtuse angle can vary within this range.

What is the measure of the obtuse angle? 18, 54, 108, 216

Given the options, the measure of the obtuse angle is 108 degrees. An obtuse angle is defined as any angle greater than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees, making 108 degrees the correct answer among the provided options.

How much degrees is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is any angle that measures between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. The exact measurement can vary, but as long as it falls within this range, it is classified as obtuse.

Which angle is obtuse?

An obtuse angle is one that measures greater than 90 degrees and less than 180 degrees. For example, angles measuring 110 degrees, 135 degrees, and 160 degrees are all obtuse angles. These angles are more open compared to acute and right angles.

What angle is obtuse?

An obtuse angle is an angle that falls within the range of more than 90 degrees and less than 180 degrees. Any angle in this range is considered obtuse, making it distinct from acute angles (less than 90 degrees) and right angles (exactly 90 degrees).

What does an obtuse angle measure?

An obtuse angle measures between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. This means any angle greater than 90 degrees and up to but not including 180 degrees is considered obtuse.

What does obtuse mean in math?

In math, "obtuse" refers to an angle that is more than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees. This term helps categorize angles based on their measurements, distinguishing obtuse angles from acute, right, and straight angles.

How much is an obtuse angle in degrees?

An obtuse angle is one that measures between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. The exact degree of an obtuse angle can vary, but it always falls within this range.

What is the degree of an obtuse angle?

The degree of an obtuse angle is any measurement between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. These angles are larger than right angles and are a fundamental concept in geometry.

What degrees is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is measured in degrees, specifically between 90 and 180 degrees. Any angle within this range is classified as obtuse.

What is the definition of an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is defined as an angle that measures more than 90 degrees and less than 180 degrees. This definition distinguishes obtuse angles from acute angles (less than 90 degrees) and straight angles (exactly 180 degrees).

What angle is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is any angle that measures more than 90 degrees but less than 180 degrees. For example, an angle measuring 120 degrees is an obtuse angle.

What shape has an obtuse angle?

Shapes that can have obtuse angles include obtuse triangles, certain quadrilaterals like parallelograms and trapezoids, and irregular polygons. These shapes incorporate obtuse angles to achieve specific structural or aesthetic properties.

What is the obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is an angle that measures between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. This makes it larger than a right angle but smaller than a straight angle, which is a fundamental concept in geometry.

How does an obtuse angle look like?

An obtuse angle looks wide and open compared to a right angle. It forms a larger spread between its two sides, making it easily recognizable in various geometric shapes and practical designs.

What degrees is a obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is measured in degrees and falls within the range of 90 degrees to 180 degrees. Any angle within this range is considered obtuse.

How much degrees is a obtuse angle?

A obtuse angle measures between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. This range makes it larger than acute angles and right angles but smaller than straight angles.

How big is an obtuse angle?

An obtuse angle is bigger than a right angle but smaller than a straight angle, measuring between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. The exact size can vary within this range.

What is the measure of the obtuse angle?

The measure of an obtuse angle is any angle that falls between 90 degrees and 180 degrees. This measurement classifies it as obtuse, distinguishing it from other types of angles.


Authors

author

Soujanya Varada

As a technical content writer and social media strategist, Soujanya develops and manages strategies at HireQuotient. With strong technical background and years of experience in content management, she looks for opportunities to flourish in the digital space. Soujanya is also a dance fanatic and believes in spreading light!

Scroll Image

Hire the best without stress

Ask us how
hq-logo

Never Miss The Updates

We cover all recruitment, talent analytics, L&D, DEI, pre-employment, candidate screening, and hiring tools. Join our force & subscribe now!

Like/ dislike something or want to co-author an article? Drop us a note!

Stay On Top Of Everything In HR