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Is Bare Minimum Monday becoming a Workplace norm?

Published on June 6th, 2023

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In a world where deadlines loom large and productivity reigns supreme, it's no surprise that the notion of "bare minimum" often creeps into the corporate sphere. With Monday's arrival, a day notorious for sluggish starts and lingering weekend blues, it's high time we address the concerns that can plague HR departments. Are they right to worry about employees settling for the bare minimum? Or is there more to this story than meets the eye?

As we delve into the intricacies of this debate, let's acknowledge the undeniable fact: Employees are the lifeblood of any organization. Their motivation, engagement, and overall satisfaction play a pivotal role in driving success. However, as the modern workforce faces mounting pressures, it's crucial to explore whether HR professionals should raise their eyebrows at the bare minimum mentality or take a more empathetic approach.

Let us see what bare minimum Monday means, how it is affecting the workplace and should HR people be worried about the fact or just go with the flow and accept this modern workplace concept.

What is “Bare Minimum Monday”?

Bare Minimum Monday is a workplace trend where employees do the least amount of work possible on Mondays in order to avoid burnout during the remaining workdays. This trend is often seen as a way to combat hustle culture, which is the idea that working long hours and being constantly busy is a sign of success.

There are a few reasons why employees might choose to do Bare Minimum Monday. Some people find that they are more productive if they start their week off slowly. Others feel that they need to take some time for self-care on Mondays in order to avoid burnout. Still others simply don't enjoy working on Mondays and see Bare Minimum Monday as a way to get through the day.

Why Do Bare Minimum Mondays Exist?

The concept of Bare Minimum Mondays exists because of the following reasons:

  • To reduce stress: Mondays can be a stressful day for many people, as they are often the day when they have to catch up on work from the previous week and start working on new projects. Bare Minimum Monday can help to reduce stress by giving employees a chance to ease into the workweek and avoid feeling overwhelmed.
  • To improve productivity: By starting the week off slowly, employees may be able to be more productive later in the week. This is because they will be less likely to feel burned out or overwhelmed.
  • To prioritize self-care: Bare Minimum Monday can encourage employees to take care of themselves on Mondays. This could involve things like getting enough sleep, eating a healthy breakfast, or taking some time for exercise.
  • To avoid burnout: Burnout is a state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion caused by excessive stress. It can lead to a number of problems, including decreased productivity, increased absenteeism, and even health problems. By starting the week off slowly, employees may be able to avoid burnout and stay healthy throughout the year.

How is Bare Minimum Monday Affecting the Workplace?

Bare minimum Monday is a relatively newer and modern workplace trend that comes with it own set of advantages and disadvantages. While some employers may benefit from it with a greater employee productivity, some may face a backlash with a much lesser employee engagement throughout the week.

Pros of Bare Minimum Monday

  • Reduced stress: Mondays can be a stressful day for many people, as they are often the day when they have to catch up on work from the previous week and start working on new projects. Bare Minimum Monday can help to reduce stress by giving employees a chance to ease into the workweek and avoid feeling overwhelmed.
  • Improved productivity: By starting the week off slowly, employees may be able to be more productive later in the week. This is because they will be less likely to feel burned out or overwhelmed.
  • Increased self-care: Bare Minimum Monday can encourage employees to take care of themselves on Mondays. This could involve things like getting enough sleep, eating a healthy breakfast, or taking some time for exercise.
  • Lesser Burnout: Bare Minimum Monday can help employees avoid burnout. By starting the week off slowly, employees may be able to avoid burnout and stay healthy throughout the year.

Cons of Bare Minimum Monday

  • Reduced productivity: If employees do the bare minimum on Mondays, they may not be able to complete all of their tasks for the week. This could lead to them feeling stressed or overwhelmed later in the week.
  • Increased workload: If employees do the bare minimum on Mondays, their colleagues may have to pick up the slack. This could lead to increased stress and burnout for everyone involved.
  • Negative perception: If employers see that employees are only doing the bare minimum on Mondays, they may have a negative perception of their work ethic. This could lead to problems such as demotions or layoffs.
  • Lesser Productivity: Bare Minimum Monday can lead to a sense of complacency. If employees get used to doing the bare minimum on Mondays, they may start to do the bare minimum on other days of the week as well. This could lead to decreased productivity and a loss of motivation.

Is Bare Minimum Monday similar to Quiet Quitting?

Both Bare Minimum Monday and Quiet Quitting can be seen as a way for employees to take control of their work-life balance and avoid burnout. However, there are some important differences between the two trends.

  • Bare Minimum Monday is a more proactive approach to self-care. It encourages employees to take care of themselves on Mondays in order to be more productive later in the week. Quiet Quitting, on the other hand, is a more passive approach. It involves disengaging from work without taking any steps to improve one's work-life balance.
  • Bare Minimum Monday can be seen as a way to improve productivity. By starting the week off slowly, employees may be able to be more productive later in the week. Quiet Quitting, on the other hand, can lead to decreased productivity. If employees are not engaged in their work, they may not be as productive.
  • Bare Minimum Monday is more likely to be accepted by employers. Employers may be more understanding of employees who are taking care of themselves on Mondays. Quiet Quitting, on the other hand, is more likely to be seen as a negative behavior. Employers may not be happy if employees are not engaged in their work.

Tips for an Effective Bare Minimum Monday for HR Professionals

  • Plan ahead: On Sunday evening, take some time to plan your Monday. What are the most important tasks that you need to complete? What can you delegate or postpone?
  • Start slowly: Don't try to do too much on Monday. Start with a few small tasks and see how you feel. If you're feeling overwhelmed, take a break.
  • Take care of yourself: Make sure to get enough sleep, eat a healthy breakfast, and take some time for exercise on Monday. Taking care of yourself will help you feel more productive and focused.
  • Set boundaries: If you have meetings or calls scheduled for Monday, let your colleagues know that you may not be able to attend all of them. You may also want to set some boundaries around your email and social media usage.
  • Be flexible: If you find that you're feeling more productive on Monday than you thought, you can always adjust your plans accordingly. However, it's important to listen to your body and not push yourself too hard.
  • Delegate tasks: If you have too much on your plate, don't be afraid to delegate tasks to your team members. This will free up your time so you can focus on the most important things.
  • Take breaks: It's important to take breaks throughout the day, even on Mondays. Get up and move around, or step outside for some fresh air. Taking breaks will help you stay focused and productive.
  • Avoid distractions: Try to avoid distractions as much as possible on Monday. This means turning off your phone, closing your email, and finding a quiet place to work.
  • Reward yourself: If you're able to complete your Bare Minimum Monday goals, reward yourself with something you enjoy. This will help you stay motivated and productive.
  • Use Technology: Utilize AI and technology for recruitment related tasks such as talent sourcing, applicant tracking, screening and assessment, video interviews and onboarding to avoid too much pressure of work.

How Employers Can Support Bare Minimum Mondays?

  • Embrace the concept. The first step is to embrace the concept of Bare Minimum Mondays and understand the benefits it can offer employees. By starting the week off slowly, employees can avoid burnout and be more productive later in the week.
  • Communicate with employees. Once you have embraced the concept, it is important to communicate with employees about Bare Minimum Mondays. Let them know that you understand why they might want to take it easy on Mondays and that you support their decision. You can also provide them with tips on how to make the most of Bare Minimum Mondays.
  • Be flexible with deadlines. If employees are taking it easy on Mondays, be flexible with deadlines. This will help them avoid feeling overwhelmed and stressed. You can also consider staggering deadlines so that employees don't have to complete all of their work on Monday.
  • Encourage self-care. Bare Minimum Mondays are all about self-care. Encourage employees to take care of themselves on Mondays by getting enough sleep, eating a healthy breakfast, and taking some time for exercise. You can also provide them with resources on self-care, such as articles or books.
  • Set a good example. As an employer, you can set a good example by taking care of yourself on Mondays. This means taking breaks, avoiding distractions, and being mindful of your own stress levels. When employees see that you are taking care of yourself, they are more likely to do the same.

Is Bare Minimum Monday Like a Four-Day Workweek?

Bare Minimum Monday and the four-day workweek are two different workplace trends that have some similarities. However, there are also some important differences between the two.

Bare Minimum Monday is a proactive practice that encourages employees to prioritize self-care on the first day of the workweek, aiming to foster a healthier work-life balance while improving overall wellbeing. This can involve doing the bare minimum on Mondays, but it can also involve other activities like taking breaks, exercising, or spending time with family and friends.

The four-day workweek is a work schedule that typically has its employees working from Monday to Thursday with Fridays off. This can be a helpful way to reduce employee stress and burnout, and it can also improve productivity.

Similarities

  • Both Bare Minimum Monday and the four-day workweek are designed to improve employee well-being.
  • Both trends can help to reduce employee stress and burnout.
  • Both trends can potentially improve productivity.

Differences

  • Bare Minimum Monday is a more individual approach to work-life balance. Employees can choose how they want to spend their Monday, whether it's by doing the bare minimum, taking care of themselves, or a combination of both.
  • The four-day workweek is a more structured approach to work-life balance. Employees are guaranteed to have Fridays off, which can help them to better manage their time and energy.

Should companies allow bare minimum Mondays?

Whether companies should allow Bare Minimum Mondays is a complex question with no easy answer. There are both pros and cons to consider.

Ultimately, whether or not companies should allow Bare Minimum Mondays is a decision that should be made on a case-by-case basis. It is important to weigh the potential benefits and drawbacks before making a decision.

If a company decides to allow Bare Minimum Mondays, it is important to set clear expectations with employees. This includes clarifying what is considered to be the bare minimum, and what the consequences are for employees who do not meet their expectations. It is also important to monitor the impact of Bare Minimum Mondays on productivity and morale. If Bare Minimum Mondays are not having the desired effect, the company may need to reconsider its policy.

How can companies prevent bare minimum Mondays?

There are a number of things that companies can do to prevent Bare Minimum Mondays, including:

  • Encouraging self-care: Companies can encourage employees to take care of themselves on Mondays by providing them with resources such as access to gyms, meditation rooms, or on-site massages. They can also offer flexible work arrangements that allow employees to start their workweek later or take breaks throughout the day.
  • Creating a positive work environment: Companies can create a positive work environment by fostering a culture of trust and respect. This means being open to feedback from employees and taking steps to address any concerns they may have.
  • Setting clear expectations: Companies should set clear expectations for employees on Mondays. This includes clarifying what is considered to be the bare minimum and what the consequences are for employees who do not meet expectations.
  • Monitoring productivity: Companies should monitor productivity levels on Mondays to see if there is a pattern of employees doing the bare minimum. If there is, they can take steps to address the issue.
  • Offer flexible work arrangements: This could include allowing employees to work from home on Mondays, start their workday later, or take a compressed workweek.
  • Provide opportunities for professional development: This could help employees feel more engaged and motivated in their work.
  • Celebrate successes: This could help to boost morale and make employees feel valued. Listen to employee feedback: This could help to identify any underlying issues that are contributing to Bare Minimum Mondays.

The Bottom Line

Bare minimum Monday is a concept that was popularised by a TikTok influencer Mariso Jo. Since then, it has become a hot topic among the employees and employers.

The rise of Bare Minimum Mondays is a sign of the times. In a world where we are constantly bombarded with demands on our time and energy, it is no wonder that many people are looking for ways to ease back into the workweek on Mondays. While some may see this as a sign of laziness or slacking off, others view it as a healthy way to prioritize self-care and prevent burnout.

Whether or not Bare Minimum Mondays become a workplace norm remains to be seen. However, one thing is for sure: the trend is a reflection of the changing values of the workforce. As we continue to place more importance on work-life balance and mental health, it is likely that we will see more and more people adopting this approach to Mondays.

So, what does this mean for employers? If you are concerned about the productivity implications of Bare Minimum Mondays, there are a few things you can do. First, be clear about your expectations with your employees. Let them know that you understand the need for self-care, but that you also expect them to be productive on Mondays. Second, offer flexible work arrangements that allow employees to start their workweek at a time that works best for them. Finally, create a culture of trust and respect so that employees feel comfortable coming to you if they are struggling to meet their deadlines.

The rise of Bare Minimum Mondays is a challenge for employers, but it is also an opportunity. By understanding the factors that are driving this trend, you can create a workplace that is supportive of employee well-being and productivity.

In conclusion, Bare Minimum Mondays are not a sign of laziness or slacking off. They are a sign of the times, and they represent a shift in the values of the workforce. As employers, we need to be aware of this trend and adapt our workplaces accordingly.


Authors

author

Radhika Sarraf

Radhika Sarraf is a content specialist and a woman of many passions who currently works at HireQuotient, a leading recruitment SaaS company. She is a versatile writer with experience in creating compelling articles, blogs, social media posts, and marketing collaterals.

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